Geotweeps Discuss...

Informative and/or fun conversations between the geological community on Twitter, archived for posterity.

May 10

Mar 9

Are geologists mostly lefties?


Jan 2

To lecture, or not to lecture?


Oct 29

Teaching through blogs and tweeting: possible, or a pipe dream?


To blog your research, or not to blog your research?


Oct 16

What’s being erupted at El Hierro

The eruption at El Hierro in the Canary Islands is taking place under the sea, but pictures from the scene are starting to show products of the eruption floating to the surface. But what are they? Read on for a crash cause in volcanic rocks that can float.

The undersea eruption has manifested at the surface in the form of a plume of dirty brown water. 

Of particular interest to watching geobloggers are these dark specks floating within the plume.
Take a look at the steaming scoria (like reticulite if its floating, right?) from the eruption off of El Hierro: http://t.co/tuCvCg0t
eruptionsblog
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog Reticulite would actually sink - the bubbles are all connected thus no way to hold the gasses in and water out.
rschott
October 15, 2011
@rschott You’re completely right - but I’m still perplexed about floating, dark pumice. Seen anything like it?
eruptionsblog
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog Haven’t collected anything like it (probably not very robust) but I’d imagine it’s just gassy scoria/mafic pumice.
rschott
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog … or, to put it another way, a black sand beach waiting to be pulverized by the waves.
rschott
October 15, 2011
@rschott If the pumice started out pretty dark (gray), being wet might make it look black.
Tuff_Cookie
October 15, 2011
@Tuff_Cookie I’d imagine this stuff has the texture of pumice or very frothy scoria, but it’s almost certainly mafic in composition.
rschott
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog @rschott so, given it’s formed underwater, would the bubbles be initially caused by steam? or volcanic gases?
Suw
October 15, 2011
@Suw Yes and yes. The volcanic gas is probably mostly water vapor/steam, though undoubtedly there’s some sulfur-bearing gas in there too.
rschott
October 15, 2011
@rschott @eruptionsblog I seem to remember seeing some on Stromboli…still, it was pretty pale. Nothing like the El Hierro photo.
Tuff_Cookie
October 15, 2011
@rschott @eruptionsblog Probably what I saw was a bit of this “golden pumice”: http://t.co/GdnhQECG
Tuff_Cookie
October 15, 2011
Experimental Crystallization of a High-K Arc Basalt: the Golden Pumice, Stromboli Volcano (Italy)
The near-liquidus crystallization of a high-K basalt (PST-9 golden pumice, 49·4 wt % SiO2, 1·85 wt % K2O, 7·96 wt % MgO) from the present-day activity of Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy) has been experimentally investigated between 1050 and 1175°C, at pressures from 50 to 400 MPa, for melt H2O concentrations between 1·2 and 5·5 wt % and ΔNNO ranging from −0·07 to +2·32.
@Tuff_Cookie @rschott @suw So, the stuff at El Hierro is dark, steaming and floating. Likely mafic composition - which usually makes scoria.
eruptionsblog
October 15, 2011
@Tuff_Cookie @rschott @suw Might it actually be clots of dark ash?
eruptionsblog
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog @rschott I’d be interested to see how long it floats - feel like ash or scoria would eventually get waterlogged and sink.
Tuff_Cookie
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog @Tuff_Cookie @Suw I’m guessing mafic composition based on El Hierro’s previous erupted products & the evident low viscosity.
rschott
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog @rschott is there a difference between that & the glassy stuff at top of most basalt lava flows?
EarthlikePlanet
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog @rschott e.g., you looking for something really puffed up, or what?
EarthlikePlanet
October 15, 2011
@EarthlikePlanet @rschott You need lots of isolated air bubbles to get the density less than water.
eruptionsblog
October 15, 2011
@rschott @eruptionsblog @Tuff_Cookie Is this what the El Hierro stuff looks like? I got this in Alaska: http://t.co/uDyR0PVw
aboutgeology
October 15, 2011
Scoria, Alaska
Photo of Alaskan scoria.
@aboutgeology @rschott @tuff_cookie We might have a winner!
eruptionsblog
October 15, 2011
@eruptionsblog is that how you’re defining pumice from scoria, by density? Seems reasonable I suppose. @rschott
EarthlikePlanet
October 16, 2011
@EarthlikePlanet Although one could use it as a purely textural term, I think pumice generally implies intermediate to felsic compositions.
rschott
October 16, 2011
@EarthlikePlanet I use scoria for anything mafic and highly vesicular.
rschott
October 16, 2011
@rschott I would agree, it is mainly amount of volatile content and viscosity that allows them to puff up. But unusual things happen.
EarthlikePlanet
October 16, 2011
@rschott @EarthlikePlanet We used pumice for >50% void in felsic/interm, scoria for >50% void in mafic; vesicular for <50% in anything.
lockwooddewitt
October 16, 2011
@lockwooddewitt @rschott I think that’s a decent classification but then by definition there’s no such thing as mafic pumice.
EarthlikePlanet
October 16, 2011
@EarthlikePlanet I don’t use the term “mafic pumice” myself, but I understand what people mean if they use it. ‘Nuf said.
rschott
October 16, 2011
@Tuff_Cookie @eruptionsblog @rschott a guy from CSIC has just said that are pillow-lava fragments and so the magma ought to be below 200m.
Lumifg
October 16, 2011


Oct 13

A Tweet’s eye view of GSA

The use of Twitter at scientific conferences is still limited to a small fraction of those in attendence, but there are enough nowadays for someone who is following the official hashtag (because there will be one) to get a flavour of what is going on. Find out for yourself thanks to Dr. Laura Guertin, who has archived some of the more memorable tweets from the just-finished Geological Society of America conference using Storify. Read about the obsessions with coffee and beer, and, the cooing over plush trilobites and stream tables, and, yes, some references to some of the cool science presented and argued over during the conference.

View the story “There are tweets, and then there are tweets… from GSA 2011” on Storify

You can also see some (limited, because I didn’t think to look into it before now) statistics for the #GSAMinn hashtag. I think the only real conclusion that can be drawn is that Twitter is still a long way from reaching a tipping point in the wider realms of academia.


Oct 10

GSA Jumps the Kraken?

The kooky conference abstract that no-one takes seriously inevitably becomes the star of the show.

Our story begins a couple of weeks ago, when a geotweep looking through the abstracts for the upcoming Geological Society of America conference comes across a rather…. fanciful…submission.

TRIASSIC KRAKEN: THE BERLIN ICHTHYOSAUR DEATH ASSEMBLAGE INTERPRETED AS A GIANT CEPHALOPOD MIDDEN
The Luning Formation at Berlin‑Ichthyosaur State Park, Nevada, hosts a puzzling assemblage of at least 9 huge (≤14 m) juxtaposed ichthyosaurs (Shonisaurus popularis). Shonisaurs were cephalopod‑eating predators comparable to sperm whales (Physeter). Hypotheses presented to explain the apparent mass mortality at the site have included: tidal flat stranding, sudden burial by slope failure, and phytotoxin poisoning.

We all had a good chuckle about this on Twitter, but the odd eccentric conference submission is not unusual (getting an abstract accepted for a conference is light years away from getting a paper accepted for publication in terms of the scientific scrutiny involved), so we quickly moved on to other ways of distracting us from the talks we should be writing.


But it seems that within the press office of the GSA, someone looked past the lack of compelling evidence to find the compelling headline. And thus, we get this:

GSA press release - Giant Kraken Lair Discovered
Boulder, CO, USA - Long before whales, the oceans of Earth were roamed by a very different kind of air-breathing leviathan. Snaggle-toothed ichthyosaurs larger than school buses swam at the top of the Triassic Period ocean food chain, or so it seemed before Mount Holyoke College paleontologist Mark McMenamin took a look at some of their remains in Nevada.
Which leads to this:
Giant ‘kraken’ lair discovered: Cunning sea monster that preyed on ichthyosaurs
Long before whales, the oceans of Earth were roamed by a very different kind of air-breathing leviathan. Snaggle-toothed ichthyosaurs larger than school buses swam at the top of the Triassic Period ocean food chain, or so it seemed before paleontologist Mark McMenamin took a look at some of their remains in Nevada.
Giant prehistoric krakens may have sculpted self-portraits using ichthyosaur bones
For decades, paleontologists have puzzled over a fossil collection of nine Triassic icthyosaurs (Shonisaurus popularis) discovered in Nevada’s Berlin-Ichthyosaur State Park. Researchers initially thought that this strange grouping of 45-foot-long marine reptiles had either died en masse from a poisonous plankton bloom or had become stranded in shallow water.

And so on. And so on. Which leads to much headdesking and rending of hair:

Sigh. Of all the cool geoscience stories being presented as #GSAMinn, media is all over the most evidence-light one. http://bit.ly/pP0jem
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
'super-intelligent Triassic KRAKEN!!' sounds exciting, the more accurate 'we've found some ichthyosaurs & they're arranged funny' less so.
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous They can get away with spouting nonsense statements @ conferences because..no peer review! once a MS is submitted, forget it
shaenasaurus
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous “media is all over the most evidence-light one. null” <— To call that “evidence-light” is EXTREMELY generous.
SauropodMike
October 10, 2011
@SauropodMike well, ‘evidence free’ is the most evidence-light you can get ;-)
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
.@Allochthonous That makes my brain hurt.
Laelaps
October 10, 2011
.@Allochthonous And I see ‘Release the Kraken’ headlines have already started to pop up. Some days, I hate the news.
Laelaps
October 10, 2011
@Laelaps What’s funny is that @drjerque found the abstract a few weeks ago and all we geotweeps had a good chuckle about it’s absurdity.
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
.@Allochthonous @drjerque Yeah, I heard some of the scuttlebutt during my museum rounds in CA. General response: ‘WTF?’
Laelaps
October 10, 2011
Which was also Brian’s reaction to the brain-dead churnalism that masqueraded as reporting of this story…
The Giant, Prehistoric Squid That Ate Common Sense
We have a serious problem with science journalism. A big one, in fact, and today that problem takes the form of a giant, prehistoric squid with tentacles so formidable that it has sucked the brains right out of staff writer’s heads.
@Laelaps Lead author Mark McMenamin has a track record of having some rather… idiosyncratic ideas.
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous I recommend checking out the kraken abstract author’s faculty profile for insight: http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/facultyprofiles/ma_mcmenamin.html
stressrelated
October 10, 2011
And it is indeed an interesting read.
Mark McMenamin :: Academics :: Mount Holyoke College
SpecializationEvolution and history of life; evolution of the atmosphere; Ediacaran fossils; Hypersea theory; Proterozoic supercontinent Rodinia; Vladimir Vernadsky’s The Biosphere; Corneille Jean Koene; Pierre Teilhard de Chardin; convergent evolution; development and spread of biological and human innovations Whether he’s teaching an introductory course on the History of Life or embarking on an archeological expedition, geologist and paleontologist Mark McMenamin maintains a spirit of disc…
Meanwhile, some scratched their heads over how someone could see ichthyosaur bones and conclude ‘cephalopod art studio’.
"The vertebral disc "pavement" [may be] the earliest known self portrait." Right. Makes sense. http://bit.ly/rfUsv4 via @Allochthonous
kwinkunks
October 10, 2011
.@kwinkunks It’s a definite #Occamfail. And I thought palaeontologists were into parsimony…
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous I’d give anything to have heard some of those conversations… “Come on, it *can’t* be a coincidence… LOOK AT THEM!”
kwinkunks
October 10, 2011
Odd arrangement of fallen leaves today, in shape of skull and crossbones. Conclude enormous, hyper-intelligent, invisible spaghetti monster.
lockwooddewitt
October 10, 2011
And, back at the conference itself, the talk went about as expected.
McMenimen’s ‘Triassic Kraken’ talk went as expected: lots and lots of conjecture #gsaminn
JurassicMatt
October 10, 2011
@JurassicMatt Any questions, or did people just want to get back to more robust palaeo stuff?
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous unfortunately he went a bit long, so no time for questions. Audience gave out a collective “awww” and chuckled
JurassicMatt
October 10, 2011

Also, people started wondering exactly why the press office of a professional geological society was promoting what is essentially speculative link-bait. 

Has GSA jumped the kraken? http://bit.ly/owYO5P
rschott
October 10, 2011
As the silly Kraken story continues to spread, could @geosociety give some insight into why they pushed out a press release about it?
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous Do you really have to ask?
chronsciguy
October 10, 2011
@chronsciguy Probably not. I can be disappointed though.
Allochthonous
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous Yes you can. As a reporter the evidence was definitely flimsy, but hey, it’s a great story!
chronsciguy
October 10, 2011
@Allochthonous I think every author has the opportunity to create a press release? @geosociety allows authors to self-promote.
stressrelated
October 10, 2011
@stressrelated @Allochthonous If GSA is going do a kraken press release one might at least expect them to seek comment from other geologists
rschott
October 10, 2011

But no-one has to ponder is why this story got so much traction in the first place.

@Allochthonous I don’t care that it’s not true, I want it to be true.
JoshRosenau
October 10, 2011


Jun 28

Fear the quake, ignore the volcanoes?

Another day, another example of California quake fear-mongering, in the form of a piece ‘reporting’ on a paper just published in Nature Geoscience.

Weather Channel has a “monster quake to come” article about San Andreas. You /know/ some people will take that as imminent prediction. Nooo.
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
Scientists Say California Mega-Quake Imminent - weather.com
by Becky Kellogg , on Jun 27, 2011 11:57 am ET
.@seismogenic You know what drives me nuts? No mention in article of (a) the actual people who did the study and (b) no link to source.
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011

Note to Weather Channel. This internet thing makes it quite easy to link to stuff. Observe (although note that full access requires a subscription).

Loading of the San Andreas fault by flood-induced rupture of faults beneath the Salton Sea : Nature Geoscience : Nature Publishing Group
The southern San Andreas fault terminates in a stepover zone [mdash] several small faults that separate major fault segments [mdash] beneath the Salton Sea. Analysis of movements on the stepover zone faults indicates that periodic flooding of the palaeo-Salton Sea during the late Holocene could have triggered earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.
Earthquake hazards: Rivers, rifts and ruptures : Nature Geoscience : Nature Publishing Group
The southern San Andreas fault is due for a large earthquake. Seismic images of sediments deposited in an ancient lake overlying the southern end of the fault indicate that episodic flooding may have triggered earthquakes in the past.
Further complaints: use of the dread word ‘overdue’ in reference to earthquakes. And:
Good things sources not named. V embarassing to be quoted saying small EQs prevent big’uns. @eruptionsblog @seismogenic http://t.co/IQ3Bw7n
mcmoots
June 27, 2011

Certain Italian seismologists would probably have some thoughts on whether even being perceived to have said something like that is a good idea. 


But there was another issue raised by the article: Californians are apparently rather blase about the potential volcano geohazard in the sunshine state.

.@seismogenic The article (with no source, again) claims that California have no fear of a volcanic eruption: http://t.co/yfyaCzr
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
At the end of the article is the result of an unsourced poll asking which natural disaster Californians fear most.

Earthquake 57% 
Wildfire 23% 
Tsunami/Tidal Wave 9% 
Flood/Mudslide 5% 
Other/No Opinion 6% 

@eruptionsblog I’d bet a lot of Californians who don’t live near volcanoes aren’t aware we have them, but article still needs to cite, yes!
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
@seismogenic @eruptionsblog Let’s see… Shasta, Lassen, Long Valley, Mono Craters, Lava Beds, +numerous sm. B&R vents. Nope, no volcs here!
lockwooddewitt
June 27, 2011

Below: a map of ‘active’ (known to have erupted in last 10,000 years) volcanoes in California, from the Smithsonian’s Global Volcanism Program.

@lockwooddewitt @eruptionsblog Of course not! Those are just media constructs designed to frighten people! Oh, wait…
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
@seismogenic @lockwooddewitt @eruptionsblog What? Have these people not seen ‘Volcano”? ;-)
Allochthonous
June 27, 2011
@Allochthonous @seismogenic @lockwooddewitt Tee hee. Tommy Lee Jones didn’t do his job apparently.
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog @seismogenic Based on folks I know in CA, I think that’s accurate (average CA residents are not concerned w/volcanic hazard).
cbdawson
June 27, 2011
@cbdawson @seismogenic I mean, it is not big a hazard as earthquakes in CA, but volcanoes are all over the state, more than any other state
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog More than Alaska?
rschott
June 27, 2011
@rschott Heh, I was going to say “in lower 48” but ran out of room. However, in terms of pop near active volcano, CA wins.
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog @cbdawson @seismogenic @rschott Calif volcs spread over state from end to end, side to side. AK’s are in one long strip.
aboutgeology
June 27, 2011
@aboutgeology @eruptionsblog Alaska has a few away from that strip as well. Hawaii’s are both spread across the state & arranged in a strip.
rschott
June 27, 2011
@rschott @aboutgeology AK and HA are more active but CA just has the population going for it.
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog Doesn’t Seattle/Tacoma’s proximity to Mt Rainier give it an edge over CA in population close to an active volcano?
rschott
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog Or even Portland, OR being near Mt. Hood? California’s active volcanoes aren’t actually that near the big population centers.
rschott
June 27, 2011
@rschott As a single volcano, but when you consider Coso, Long Valley, Salton Buttes, Shasta, Lassen and all, it makes a run at Rainier.
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
@rschott Or the air traffic hazard for Shasta, Lassen, Mono/Inyo, others mean that even remote volcanoes a hazard for CA.
eruptionsblog
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog @seismogenic I think most people are completely unaware. For example, friends are surprised that lassen erupted <100 yrs ago.
cbdawson
June 27, 2011
@eruptionsblog @seismogenic Even when they know a feature is volcanic, don’t see it as threat. More geo ignorance than reality avoidance.
cbdawson
June 27, 2011
@cbdawson @eruptionsblog My natural hazards class seemed legitimately shocked when I told them Mammoth is a volcano.
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
@cbdawson @eruptionsblog I have some Mammoth pics! Also Amboy Crater, though it’s extinct.
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
A strange counterbalancing on the west coast of the US:
@eruptionsblog @seismogenic @cbdawson @rschott So in California they fear quakes and ignore volcanoes; and vice versa for PNW?
Allochthonous
June 27, 2011
@Allochthonous @eruptionsblog @cbdawson @rschott That’s impression I get. Was discussing lack of tsunami awareness in PNW on day of Japan EQ
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
Seeing Mt. Rainier is an important index of non-mistygloom. We fixate on it. @Allochthonous @eruptionsblog @seismogenic @cbdawson @rschott
mcmoots
June 27, 2011
@Allochthonous @eruptionsblog @seismogenic @cbdawson @rschott My sense is they fear both but don’t want to bother (pay) prepping for either.
lockwooddewitt
June 27, 2011
@Allochthonous @eruptionsblog @seismogenic @rschott That’s a fair statement about CA. Altho, people fear EQs but still don’t prep enough.
cbdawson
June 27, 2011
@cbdawson @Allochthonous @eruptionsblog @rschott Many probably go by mentality of “a quake will hit other parts of CA before one hits here!”
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
@seismogenic @eruptionsblog @rschott @cbdawson ‘We thought it would never happen to us’ is a common post-disaster lament.
Allochthonous
June 27, 2011
@Allochthonous @eruptionsblog @rschott @cbdawson Which is all the more reason people need to be prepared!
seismogenic
June 27, 2011
@lockwooddewitt @allochthonous @eruptionsblog @seismogenic @rschott For individuals I think it’s also mental coping mech for dealing w/risk.
cbdawson
June 27, 2011
Digression:
@rschott @aboutgeology @eruptionsblog Hawaii may have the highest volcano to land ratio, but no good disaster film possibilities!
ugrandite
June 27, 2011
@ugrandite @rschott @aboutgeology @eruptionsblog Sure there is: massive calving landslide & subsequent tsunami- with added bonus: plausible!
lockwooddewitt
June 27, 2011
++bonus: Heroes in a Hawaii tsunami flick = scantily clad surfers! @lockwooddewitt @ugrandite @rschott @aboutgeology @eruptionsblog
mcmoots
June 27, 2011

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Jun 27

Quake Prediction is impossible - and @QuakePrediction sucks

You can’t predict earthquakes in the ‘be somewhere else next Tuesday sense’. Geologists would love it if we could. We don’t love it so much when people claim that they can predict earthquakes, needlessly scaring thousands of people in the process.

Perrykid asks a question which many probably ask when they see junk like this:

Strong earthquake (possibly major) likely in California in next 38 hrs. Please see risk graph, maps and details @ http://www.quakeprediction.com/
Quakeprediction
June 26, 2011
(note that, if you scan back in the Quakeprediction timeline a few days, the time window is somewhat…flexible. If your baloney detector is working right, that should trigger an alarm bell.)
What’s with @quakeprediction - are they for real? They predict a quake in California in the next couple of days.
perrykid
June 26, 2011
@perrykid With 16k+ suckers listening in.
jeffersonite
June 26, 2011
@jeffersonite Yowza. 16k terrified people now. They said it could be “major”.
perrykid
June 26, 2011
@perrykid If I had figured out how to predict earthquakes I’d go straight to the least monetizable means of advertizing my service, too.
rschott
June 26, 2011
@rschott @perrykid Ugh, the more I read on that site the more aggravated I get. Not the way to educate the public re emergency-preparedness.
volcanojw
June 26, 2011
@perrykid @rschott wow, that quake prediction site is pathetic, can’t believe he’s got that many people following him on twitter
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@perrykid @rschott he says main prediction method is using “thermal temp changes caused by kinetic frictional heating of tectonic plates” ..
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@perrykid @rschott .. yet, no other information or data about how he gets those measurements
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus @perrykid @rschott Seen that site before. Vague predictions. Even vaguer description of methodology. Definite hooey.
Allochthonous
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus But that quakeprediction account is based on research since *2005*! A whole six years! #sarcasm #bunk
cbdawson
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus but there COULD be an earthquake in the next…42 hrs. Then how would you feel? Sigh…
emiglio
June 26, 2011
@emiglio doesn’t matter if he’s “right” once in a while, he doesn’t explain his method, it’s hidden, he’s a dangerous crackpot
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus The scary part is when he is coincidentally right. It bolsters his defense and he remains an opportunistic scam artist
emiglio
June 26, 2011
@emiglio yeah, exactly … as the old saying goes: even a broken clock is right twice a day
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@perrykid Quake prediction is snake oil. Don’t buy it.
eruptionsblog
June 26, 2011
Latest @ Quakeprediction for M6-7 quake in Frazier Park, near Ft. Tejon center of 1857 M8 quake. San Andreas Fault there has no small quakes
EricFielding
June 26, 2011
Just to be clear about my last tweet, I don’t believe the prediction of an imminent quake on the San Andreas Fault near Frazier Park.
EricFielding
June 26, 2011
@EricFielding Well, the statement only says the event is “likely”, does that even count as a prediction? ;-)
CPPGeophysics
June 26, 2011
@CPPGeophysics They call themselves Quakeprediction and they give a short time window, but you are right they use weasel word likely.
EricFielding
June 27, 2011

So, a fairly unanimous verdict of ‘bogus’: and is this a conflict of interest we see before us?

@Allochthonous @perrykid @rschott if you look at very bottom of home page you can see what he’s selling: emergency supplies
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus @perrykid @rschott Aha. Of course, people in California probably *should* have an earthquake kit…
Allochthonous
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus @perrykid @rschott ..but you shouldn’t use pseudoscience to sell one.
Allochthonous
June 26, 2011

The worst thing is: the Quakeprediction twitter account has 16,000 perpetually misinformed followers.

so, the twitter account @quakeprediction has 16,000 followers — I’d love to be able to inform all 16,000 that it’s completely full of sh!t
clasticdetritus
June 26, 2011
@clasticdetritus PT Barnum was right.
rschott
June 26, 2011
@rschott @clasticdetritus They’re selling the illusion of control, predictability & security - it’s an easy sell.
Allochthonous
June 26, 2011
@rschott @clasticdetritus Also, suspect there’s probably a lot of ‘just in case’ followers as well.
Allochthonous
June 26, 2011

I was interested in seeing exactly what effect @Quakeprediction’s scaremongering was having: a quick Twitter search revealed some heartening skepticism.

@Quakeprediction every day its the same old shit with you. Praying for Armageddon. Only today is doubled, cuz nothing happened yesterday.
Shark_B8_
June 26, 2011
Nice to see that searching for @Quakeprediction reveals a fair amount of skepticism about their bogus predictions. Well done, Twitter.
Allochthonous
June 26, 2011
@Allochthonous @perrykid @clasticdetritus @rschott LOL, check this out > @quackprediction
kwinkunks
June 26, 2011
@Quakeprediction bullshit.
quackprediction
April 28, 2011
Which is, I think, a good summary of geologists’ opinion of Quakeprediction. Our recommendation: only follow to point and laugh, or to alert you to when you will need to reassure your Californian friends.

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